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Friday, March 28, 2008

Sixth State Appolgizes For Slavery

I just got this email from my friend Baruti
support our efforts Get A Gold Membership in Buck Fifty Miracle.Info

FYI - A sixth state - Florida - apologizes for slavery in America.

"Principal" Baruti Kafele
"I'm on FIRE!!!"

Baruti's Site


Florida Legislature Apologizes for State’s History of Slavery


By DAMIEN CAVE and CHRISTINE JORDAN SEXTON
Published: March 27, 2008
TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — The Florida Legislature formally apologized Wednesday for the state’s “shameful” history of slavery, joining five other states that have expressed public regret for what Senator Barack Obama, the Democratic presidential candidate, recently called America’s “original sin.”

The two-page resolution passed overwhelmingly in the Senate and then the House, bringing at least one lawmaker to tears. Gov. Charlie Crist, a Republican, called it a “significant step” toward reconciliation.

“All that is necessary for evil to prevail is for good people to do nothing,” Mr. Crist said in an interview, quoting the philosopher Edmund Burke. “I think we are reminded of that today because it takes courage to do the right thing, and it’s not always easy.”

Several black lawmakers, especially Senator Anthony C. Hill Sr., Democrat of Jacksonville, have been pushing for a public apology since last year. What eventually passed on Wednesday resembled statements issued by North Carolina, Alabama, Virginia, Maryland and New Jersey, the last state to apologize for slavery with a resolution in January.

The Florida resolution expressed “profound regret” for the state’s role “in sanctioning and perpetuating involuntary servitude upon generations of African slaves.” It did not use the word apology, but Mr. Hill said the statement’s intent was clear.

“At the end of the day we said three words: ‘I am sorry,’ ” he said. “I think now we can begin the healing process of reconciliation.”

Florida’s history with slavery is unusual. Its roots stretch back to the settlement of St. Augustine in 1565, and slaves here took part in a wide array of industries, including cattle ranching in central Florida and sugar cane harvests in Tampa.

“From 1845 to 1860, it was one of the fastest-growing slave states in the union,” said Larry E. Rivers, author of “Slavery in Florida” and president of Fort Valley State University in Georgia. “When things were slowing down in Virginia and still going in South Carolina and North Carolina, slavery in Florida was growing in leaps and bounds.”

The state’s first slave laws were enacted by the Territorial Legislative Council in 1822. Mirroring the laws of other Southern states, they included such punishments as nailing slaves’ ears to posts if they were caught stealing.

Some of this history was recounted before the Legislature, and was included in the resolution. It was enough to draw clear sobs from Senator Arthenia L. Joyner, Democrat of Tampa.

The governor said such emotions were understandable.

“I don’t think you could listen to some of the punishments that were meted out in the past before Florida became more enlightened without being moved by it,” Mr. Crist said.

Florida has made other efforts to address the consequences of institutional racism; in 1994, the state allocated $2.1 million to surviving victims of the Rosewood massacre, the 1923 attack on a black town in North Florida.

And on Wednesday, Mr. Crist said he was open to evaluating whether broader reparations for slavery would be worth pursuing. He warned, however, that this was not the year, given Florida’s looming $3 billion budget deficit.

Some black leaders said they hoped that the addition of another state’s resolution would lead Congress to offer an apology of its own — if only to document regrets expressed in speeches by President Bush and President Bill Clinton.

At the very least, they said, Florida’s statement is likely to continue the country’s amplified conversation about race, inspired in part by Mr. Obama’s candidacy.

“It’s a good time for the whole nation to address race in a different way,” said Carol M. Swain, a professor of political science and law at Vanderbilt University who supports a national apology for slavery. “We do need to have the conversation. And it’s a much broader conversation than Barack Obama was able to introduce in his speech.”

Damien Cave reported from Miami, and Christine Jordan Sexton from Tallahassee.

Delete Reply Forward

Sunday, March 23, 2008

From My Friend The Principal - Joseph Walker Memorial Fund

When I got this email I had to chuckle at first. Baruti is far from the type of person to not self-promote. Here is the contents:

Good afternoon,

As all of you know, I try to shy away from self-promotion, but in this case, the cause is most significant.

Following is a brief overview from the organizer of the event and founder of the Joseph Walker Memorial Fund – Mr. Todd Walker


Message from Todd Walker

The Joseph Walker Memorial Fund was created after my father’s death in January 2000. “The Fund” has sponsored camperships for students as well as scholarships for elementary students, and high school graduating seniors.

Our first annual banquet was held in March 2007. We are planning another banquet on March 29, 2008 at The Essex House, 525 Northfield Avenue, West Orange from 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. The guest speaker will be Baruti Kafele, an educational and motivational speaker. Mr. Kafele has written several books geared towards educating African American Children and Teachers.

You may purchase a ticket from Todd Walker (908)-938-0320 or Bernice Walker (973)-676-6257. The cost is $ 55.00 per person. You may show your support by purchasing an ad / booster that will appear in our souvenir banquet booklet.


KAFELE
"I'm on FIRE!!!"

Sunday, March 16, 2008

BlendTalk Radio Wants to Hear You

What do you get when you combine an open mic, AM
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We've Got Oprah, Tolle, Jack Canfield, Dr. Joe Capista,
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It's fun, it's exciting, It's the right
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Call in (646) 595-4215 Enjoy and pass it on.
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Thursday, March 13, 2008

African American History Found Not Worthy

In a way it is the fault of the limited mind proponents that started the study of African American history with just Jamestown. But it is more a validation that society at large does not value the experiences and contribution the Black Americans have made to world history.

Charles Drew, Mathew Henderson, Prince Hall, Oprah Winfrey, Tiger Woods, Bill Cosby are not worth study and not to be held with the same regard as the Latin Americans or Asian History. The reality of the situation is that African American history is a result of the omission of African Americans in American History.

I thank God for my parents who educated me to my culture so that I wasn't dependent on any college system to validate my importance. It is truly unfortunate that the Black Students today are so duped on multiculturalism to the exclusion of their own contributions.

For Immediate Release February 26, 2008

AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY NO LONGER RECOGNIZED AS “LEGITIMATE” by the STATE of NEW JERSEY COMMUNITY COLLEGES

In a startling move, the Community College Academic Officer’s Association (CCAOA) of New Jersey excluded African American History from the New Jersey Community College General Education curriculum. The murder of African American History within the academic curriculum directly contradicts the State’s recent apology for slavery. The Association’s reasoning that African American history is about a “subset” of people creates even more dissonance with the supposed apology.

African American history was the only history excluded. The Association accepted Latin American History, Asian Civilization, American History, World Civilization and Survey of African History with the explanation that these courses are more “global” in nature. The use of the term “subset” to describe African Americans is reminiscent of the historical 3/5 of a person designation for southern slaves.

The restructure comes as an outgrowth of the new Lampett transfer legislation. The Lampett Legislation will require all four year colleges to accept all of the General Education courses a student completes when they graduate from a two New Jersey Community College with an Associates degree. The omission of African American History from the General Education category reduces the likelihood that students will be exposed to this important part of American history. Importantly, this categorization invalidates the important history and critical contribution of 14% of the population of New Jersey that is African American and the overall move towards a global economy.

The CCAOA also removed all African American and Women's literature courses from the General Education curriculum. This move to eliminate these courses is very far reaching. It affects all community colleges and their students through out the entire State of New Jersey. Ironically, the State passed the Amistad Legislation in 2002 which mandates the incorporation African American history into the teaching of American history in all primary and secondary schools through out the state.

The Newark Branch of the NAACP, New Black Panther Party – Newark Chapter, the African Commission of the City of Newark, and the Coalition of Concerned Educators of New Jersey (CCENJ) are diametrically opposed to this action. Educators are in the process of appealing this inexplicably narrow minded decision. For more information contact murderofafricanamericanhistory@gmail.com

Saturday, March 8, 2008

Thank You Sister Aishah Muhammad and Minister Louis Farrahkan

I want to thank everyone who attended and sent representatives to honor the coming home of Evelyn Esther Carter, (July 6, 1921 - March 2, 2008). Especially Sis. Aishah Muhammad, who brought well wishes for the family from the Nation of Islam and the Minister Louis Farrahkan; Christian Love Ministries; Cotton Funeral Home Newark; and all those who attended early this day.

Sister Aishah read the following poem which was written by my cousin Guy Eric Carter:

Her face is the face you've come to know as well as you know your own.
Her voice is the voice you long to hear when you're sad or just alone.
Her hands are the hands that reach out first to comfort, help, or guide.
Her heart is the heart that understands who you really are inside.
Her care is the care you count on and need more than any other.
Her Name is the word that means love to the world.
And that wonderful name is MOTHER.
I'm thankful for the things you are and for things you've done
to make my world a better place, my life a happier one...
And I hope you understand how proud I'll always be
to have a special MOTHER, who means so much to me.

Copyright 2008, Guy Eric Carter

My Auntie Ev when to and graduate from Dickerson High School In Jersey City, New Jersey. Known to everyone as Evelyn (except for me) or "Eve", she was a the kind of person who loved people especially her family. We had great times at Christmas, New Years and Thanksgiving.

I remember I would constantly eat the fruit cake that she had brought for my father because we bore the same name. I can remember my father going over to watch wrestling. She loved Tiger Woods.

During one of the many political campaigns she worked on with my father she fell in love with doing Crypto-quotes in Star-Ledger. She also had other puzzles she loved to do.

I remember when she was living in Jersey City on Myrtle Avenue and the dog Duke. I remember when I was a child and I used to love the personal gifts that my Uncle Frank Coggins and Aunt Nancy would make.

She also loved game shows and soap opera's. Shopping and going to Atlantic City was also something she loved to do.

She was employed by the RCA Corporation and later, First Fidelity Bank, now known as Wachovia Bank, from where she retired.

Evelyn was survived by her loving son, Guy Eric Carter, a daughter in law, Sherry Carter Weaver, two granddaughters Bree and Arielle Carter and a host of nieces, nephews, others relatives and many friends.

I'll talk more about the services and everything over the course of the next few days.

About That Coalition - Online Business Alliance/1 Up Cash System

There is so much that is occurring world wide we at Hudson Liberty are changing our focus to making more people aware of what is going on and how they can help.
Support our efforts by participating in one or both of our business models. Online Business Alliance and 1 Up Cash System"

Murder rates are up. Shootings are out of control and blood is in the streets. But now, a group of Philadelphia civic leaders plan to do something about it. At an

Anti-Violence Summit held yesterday at the Church of the Advocate in North Philadelphia, 53 people and organizations pledged support for the campaign in writing. The document states that the signers agree to support "all reasonable efforts to promote the healing of our communities. I/we also agree to set aside any past, present or future disagreements that may interfere with, or in any way inhibit our ability to work harmoniously to achieve our common goal of healing our respective communities.” The meeting, organized by the Philadelphia Black Public Issues Forum and moderated by activist Gary Adams, brought together an array of different voices at the renowned church at 18 th and Diamond streets. "We need to take control of our own lives and our own communities," lawyer and activist John Churchville told the audience, receiving appreciative applause. "Each of us has a piece of the solution…” Wesley Wilson-Bey (Men United Against Violence) said. “Strength in combating violence comes in numbers. No one organization is going to win this war. It's like cancer. We've got to come together. We really do."

Excerpted from an article by Regina Medina, Writer for the Philadelphia Daily News July 17, 2006

Greetings,

On July 16th 2006, a diverse group of activists and organizations met and signed pledges to work together to solve problems in our communities that affect us all. If you were unable to attend, it is not too late to become a part of this historic coalition.

Included in this package is the Pledge of Commitment. Have an authorized representative of your group or organization complete this form to become part of The Coalition and to be placed on the Weekly Digest mailing list which alerts members to events and projects which affect our communities. Membership is also available through our Google Group “The Coalition” http://groups.google.com/group/coalition-the, which has many valuable resources for community based organizations.

The uniqueness of an association such as The Coalition is it gives a more powerful voice and community resources to the smallest neighborhood groups, while allowing the larger groups to become more effective and maintain their identity and individualism.

Our initial offensive reached out to many families and parenting groups and was very successful. Quoting Dr. Churchville, founder of Philadelphia Black Public Issues Forum…

“If you or I had the answer, there would be no problem… but each of us has a piece, and together we have the answer.”

Doing what most have considered impossible, we have put aside our differences to become a single unit of unique endeavors.



Who we are

The Coalition is a collective of organizations and persons who have already demonstrated their individual commitment to finding and implementing solutions to the ills that plague our communities.

Sincere Philadelphia-area activists joined to form The Coalition. Our members are focused on one specific goal: Improving the quality of life for our families. Although we may have different methods of reaching our goal, we will work collectively to achieve success.

The Coalition operates on the idea that there are already organizations in place to address most, if not all of the problems particular to our communities, and that through networking, we can channel these forces in an intelligent and focused assault. We realize that in order to heal the Nation, we must begin with the family nucleus. We have recruited, and are continuing to solicit organizations that target family health.


The tendency to depend on outside forces and political 'misleadership' has been a major source of inertia and apathy among our peoples. Politicians with personal, financial and celebrity agendas feed off the carrion, which is the devastation of our neighborhoods.
The only way to defeat this physical and psychological blighting is to heal the families that make up our neighborhoods. Only then will we be able to effect change through legislation and self-policing of our communities.

We have begun at the level of the immediate concern, our young people, Frederick Douglas once said:

"It is easier to build children than it is to repair men."

We must offer alternatives and set examples as to how to conduct ourselves with honor and respect. We extend to you the opportunity to support and be supported by organizations of similar ilk.

Join The Coalition!

Mission Statement

Our mission is to network and channel individual and organization expertise, skills, abilities and resources into a collective and cooperative force; thereby maximizing our effectiveness to improve the quality of life for our families.

What We Have Done

The Coalition launched the first of a series of Young People’s Anti-Violence Summits to elicit the opinions and involvement of the youth most affected by the horrid conditions extant today. On August 16, 2006, The Coalition held our first Young People's Anti-Violence Summit The summit was for youth from junior high school age through the early twenties. The summit afforded the young people freedom of expression, and a forum to discuss amongst themselves the issues and concerns that shape their current world. As adult activists and concerned community organizations, we provided a safe, welcoming, and open environment where our young people spoke with, heard and listened to themselves without the lectures occasional discouraging words they have come to expect from their elders. The summit convened at the Most Worshipful Prince Hall Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania.

Our second Young People's Anti-Violence Summit was held at Club 923 on Watts Street in North Philadelphia. The Coalition again convened another Young People’s Anti-Violence Summit gathering to get our young people actively involved in the shaping of solutions to their immediate concerns. The popular youth television program Urban Expressions was present, and became involved by taping and broadcasting our first televised interview.

The next Young People’s Anti-Violence Summit was hosted by Teens-In-Charge on April 21, 2007 at the High School Of The Future.

On January 21, 2007, Physicians for Social Responsibility and The Coalition presented a "Bullying Management Workshop" for schools and organizations. The workshop featured Mr. Kenneth Houston, conflict resolution expert, who presented dispute-resolution workshops that were designed to teach preventative methods that can be utilized by individuals and organizational staff.



The Coalition has launched A HAND UP! An internet group that facilitates the transfer and sharing of resources between groups that have surplus or no longer needed resources with those who have an immediate need of those resources. (http://groups.google.com/group/a-hand-up)

The Coalition continues to meet with many leaders of faith based organizations in the Philadelphia area to convene our first ‘Interdenominational World Faith-based Summit’ to bring to bear our religious community's strength on the problem of community decline.



Other upcoming events will deal with effective leadership, conflict resolution; parenting and a unique summit featuring many of the area’s faith-based organizations who seek to dissolve denominational boundaries and focus some of the most powerful forces in our communities on these problems. You may attend any of our events to participate, learn more and/or have your group, your place of worship or your organization become part of The Coalition.

For more information: 215.387.2734

Email: the.pa.coalition@gmail.com

and join our Google group: http://groups.google.com/group/coalition-the
The Coalition



(A Partial Listing of Committed Organizations)



*
* Adolescent Intervention Network
* Black Political Study for Social Change
* Black Women’s Defense League
* Boycott and Protest, Inc.
* Buffalo Soldiers Seeds of Progress
* Civil Alert World
* Club 923
* Concerned Men of Courage and Commitment
* Cross and Crescent-Shepherds in the Street
* Digital Divide Community Network
* DMB Communications-Phila.
* Ex-Offenders for Community Improvement
* Fatherhood Institute
* Fathers' and Children's Equality
* For My Daughter
* Germantown Clergy Initiative
* Gypsy Lane Technologies
* House of Umoja
* Institute For Africana Studies
* International Words of Women
* Jubilee School
* Kingsessing Recreation Center advisory Council
* Liberation Fellowship Church of Jesus, Inc.
* Liberation Fellowship Community Development Corporation
* Logan News Group
* Men United Against Violence
* Million Mom March
* Moor’s Order of the Round Table
* Moorish Unification Council of the World
* National Union of American Families
* Neighborhood Bike Works, Inc.
* Nine-0-Six Multimedia
* Nu Juice Foundation
* Open Arms Against Abuse Services
* People Achieving Positive Attitudes, Inc.
* Peace Not Guns
* Philadelphia Black Public Issues Forum
* Physicians for Social Responsibility
* Quiet Rage
* R.F.S., Inc.
* Raising Awareness Immediately
* Resources for Children’s Health
* Richard Wright Centennial
* Sankofa Association of Roxborough
* Sankofa Empowerment
* S.E.E.D. Concepts
* Southwest Action Coalition
* Stop the Madness/Stop the Violence
* Teens In Charge
* The Cecil B. Moore Community Foundation
* The Churchville Triad Group, L.L.C.
* The Fr. Paul M. Washington Community Committee
* Untamed Philly
* Urban Entrepreneurs
* Urban Expressions
* Village of Arts and Humanities
* We Care Productions
* Yamagochi Academies
*



THE COALITION PLEDGE OF COMMITMENT

For the purpose of retrieving the lost, retaining the endangered, and preserving our future, I, __________________

___________(print name), representing ______________________________________ (organization/city/state),

do hereby pledge my/our commitment, and with authority granted me by _____________ ____________(Authorized individual/committee), of _____________________________(organization listed above), herein pledge my/our support

of all reasonable efforts to promote the healing of our communities.

I/we also agree to set aside any past, present or future disagreements that may interfere with, or in any way inhibit our

ability to work harmoniously to achieve our common goal of healing our respective communities.

I/we further pledge to, where possible, assist in all reasonable efforts, irrespective of origin, designed to contribute to the healthy restoration of our families, communities and Nation.

Pledged by______________________ (signature), representing__________________________ (organization) _______________________________ (organization address)

_______________________________

_______________________________ (telephone/mobile)

_______________________________ (email)

_______________________________ (fax)

_______________________________ (website)

_______________________________ (contact person)

"Great acts are made up of small deeds.”

Lao Tzu

Today’s date: _____________________

Your Organization: _________________________________________

Your Mission Statement /Purpose:_________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________________________

How can The Coalition help? ____________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________
Check Mail Compose

Friday, March 7, 2008

African American History NOT WORTHY OF STUDY

More and more I'm finding the emails I receive are worth are passing on. CREEPING ELIMINATION OF BLACK VALUE IS WHAT WE HAVE HERE!!! It is great that the Black Business Space is attracting more and more people. However we have much more to do because those who don't have our best interest are ever busy.

Please Do Two Things If You Haven't Become a Black Business Builder Do So Immediately and pass this message on.

An Update from: Fayemi Shakur

Peace Family,

I forwarded your press release to contacts at the Star Ledger and other local and national media. Then I forwarded it to the organizations referenced in the press release and their overseers - the New Jersey Community College Academic Officers Association (NJCCAOA) and The NJ Council of Community Colleges. The Council seemed surprised that this information was public knowledge and was genuinely shook. ;) The Director of Communications, Jacob Farbman, contacted me as requested in an email I sent to him.

He said "these courses have not and will not be removed". He learned there was a "preliminary discussion" during a New Jersey Community College Academic Officers Association subcommittee meeting about removing these courses from the general curriculum. I told him I was shocked to hear that this would even be up for discussion at all. He quickly agreed and asked what his organization should do to address the concerns being raised. I suggested issuing a press statement from his office about the matter to get it cleared up. He wanted to know if the press had been contacted. I said they most likely had.

Who knows how far this foolishness could have really gone. It isn't going anywhere now thanks to the development and curriculation of this press release. (although I did have to edit it a little. can't send langugae like the murder of our history out if we want it be received by folks outside our community).

If we don't respect our history, well, no one else will and too often we let things go.

I definitely agree we have to teach our own, open our own schools and we shouldn't expect that traditional schools will teach RIGHT history. BUT, for some, these institutions are the only place where some in our community will ever study Black history at length. It was both my college professors AND community professors who provided knowledge about my history. Once I got a taste, I sought out the rest on my own. Access to African-American history is important.

THANKS Y'ALL for keeping us informed. What happens next is always up to us.

Bless,
fayemi

mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm

----- Original Message -----
Subject: Re: FW: AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY NO LONGER RECOGNIZED AS "LEGITIMATE"by NEW JERSEY COMMUNITY COLLEGES
Date: Thu, 6 Mar 2008 02:59:39 -0800 (PST)

they did it because we let them. just like we have been trained to do. they will continue until we

break the chains of psychological enslavement

Baruti Kafele wrote:


FYI

"Principal" Baruti Kafele
"I'm on FIRE!!!"

http://www.principalkafele.com




Subject: AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY NO LONGER RECOGNIZED AS "LEGITIMATE"by NEW JERSEY COMMUNITY COLLEGES


For Immediate Release February 26, 2008

AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY NO LONGER RECOGNIZED AS "LEGITIMATE" by the STATE of NEW JERSEY COMMUNITY COLLEGES

In a startling move, the Community College Academic Officer's Association (CCAOA) of New Jersey excluded African American History from the New Jersey Community College General Education curriculum. The murder of African American History within the academic curriculum directly contradicts the State's recent apology for slavery. The Association's reasoning that African American history is about a "subset" of people creates even more dissonance with the supposed apology.

African American history was the only history excluded. The Association accepted Latin American History, Asian Civilization, American History, World Civilization and Survey of African History with the explanation that these courses are more "global" in nature. The use of the term "subset" to describe African Americans is reminiscent of the historical 3/5 of a person designation for southern slaves.

The restructure comes as an outgrowth of the new Lippett transfer legislation. The Lippet Legislation will require all four year colleges to accept all of the General Education courses a student completes when they graduate from a two New Jersey Community College with an Associates degree. The omission of African American History from the General Education category reduces the likelihood that students will be exposed to this important part of American history. Importantly, this categorization invalidates the important history and critical contribution of 14% of the population of New Jersey that is African American and the overall move towards a global economy.

The CCAOA also removed all African American and Women's literature courses from the General Education curriculum. This move to eliminate these courses is very far reaching. It affects all community colleges and their students through out the entire State of New Jersey. Ironically, the State passed the Amistad Legislation in 2002 which mandates the incorporation African American history into the teaching of American history in all primary and secondary schools through out the state.

The Newark Branch of the NAACP, New Black Panther Party √ Newark Chapter, the African Commission of the City of Newark, and the Coalition of Concerned Educators of New Jersey (CCENJ) are diametrically opposed to this action. Educators are in the process of appealing this inexplicably narrow minded decision. For more information contact murderofafricanamericanhistory@gmail.com.

On Tue, Mar 4, 2008 at 2:30 PM, patrice davis wrote:

Thank you for your interest. Here are the emails and addresses:


Dr. Susan Smith
Gloucester County College
1400 Tanyard Road
Sewell, NJ 08080
ssmith@gccnj.edu

Dr. Abegail Douglas-Johnson
Hudson County Community College
70 Sip Ave
Jersey City, NJ 07036
ajohnson@hcc.edu

Dr. Judith Redwine
Mercer Community College
West Winsor Campus
1200 Old Trenton Road
West Winsor, NJ 08550
redwinej@mccc.edu

Dr. Arthur Wexler
Atlantic Community College
Wexler@atlantic.edu
609-343-4989

Dr. Gary Porter
Bergen Community College
400 Paramus Road
Paramus, NJ 07652
gporter@bergen.edu
201-447-7190

Nancy Kegelman
Brookdale Community College
765 Newman Springs Road
Lincroft, NJ 07738-1543
nkegelman@brookdalecc.edu

Dr. Kathleen Carter
Burlington Community College
601 Pemberton-Brown Mills Road
Pemberton, NJ 0868
kcarter@bcc.edu
Dr. Margaret Hamilton
Camden Community College
PO Box 200
College Drive
Blackwood, NJ 08012
mhamilton@camdencc.edu

Dr. Dominic Latorraca
College of Morris
214 Center Grove Road
Randolph, NJ 07869
dlatorraca@ccm.edu

Dr. Thomas Isekenegbe
Cumberland County College
PO Box 1500
College Drive
Vineland, NJ 08362
tisekenegbe@cc.nj.edu

Sunday, March 2, 2008

Auntie Eve Return Home Tonight

Evelyn Carter born Evelyn Coggins, return home to the lord tonight. I had discussed plans to go see her in the hospital today with my mother, but the didn't materialize. Fortunately, my mother did get to see her one last time today.

I got the call a few minutes ago from my Cousin Guy. He had called me yesterday to let me know that his mother was had been transferred to East Orange General Hospital. I had done a three way with him to let him give my mother the information also.

It was an odd day. I had been receiving various calls today about the radio shows. I also was battling a cold. Taking lots of vitamin Cs and getting rest to combat it effects.

Just before I was on my way going a fellowship meeting I received a phone call for help. I did my best to do what I could with my limited power and turned rest to the infinite power of God.

I'm still not fully registering the passing of my Auntie Eve. I'll be putting down more on her life over the next few days as things progress. I will end on this note with her passing one generation of Coggins' have finally return home. Now she is with her brothers Carl, Clarence, Frank, and her sisters Margie and Sylvia.

God bless you Auntie Eve. Our prayers are with you cousin Guy.

Gospel Day

I just received this in the email and I thought I'd share it with those who are reading this blog:

Calling all Choirs/Soloists. Anyone interested in participating in the 14th Annual Gospel Day Celebration to be held on June 22, 2008 from 2:00 - 7:30 PM in Arlington Park, Jersey City, please submit an un-returnable CD/Tape/DVD/VHS to Eunice Rivers @ 201-344-1658. CALL NOW SPACE IS LIMITED.
Vendors are also needed for this Event.

Eunice was a recent guest on the Lazzeo Live Radio Show Saturday Night Edition. Let others know. There are some other events which will be coming also.

One of my friends from Snapvine is hosting a domestic violence awareness conference check out her blog and let me know what you think. And make sure you subscribe here to keep up with the latest developments.

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Success has many different meanings to different people. I have found that there are somethings which must take place first. Number 1 is having Financial Freedom. Without having Financial Freedoms our dreams are always subject to the sway of others. The slave's dreams are influenced by the slave master.